homemissionnews & eventsboard membersjoin resourcescontact

Copyright © 2018 - American Research Center in Egypt / New York
ARCE NY logo courtesy of Dr. Ogden Goelet

ARCE/NY LECTURE, March 14, 2019
AMERICAN RESEARCH CENTER IN EGYPT/NEW YORK 

The American Research Center in Egypt, New York Chapter (ARCE/NY), presents the following in our Winter/Spring 2019 Lecture Series:​​

The Amarna Revolution From Above: Case Studies


SPEAKER: Dr. Betsy Bryan, President of the Board of Governors of the American Research Center in Egypt, Inc. and Alexander Badawy Professor of Egyptian Art and Archaeology, Johns Hopkins University 

Upcoming Egyptology Lectures in New York

March 15, 2019 ESNY Lecture. Dr. Elizabeth Hart. Ancient Egyptian Craftsmanship and Jewelry: Early Dynastic Flint Bracelets.  6:30 PM at The Art Study Room, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

April 16, 2019. ARCE/NY Lecture. Dr. Aidan Dodson, University of Bristol.  Sethy I, King of Egypt: his life and afterlife.  6:00 PM at Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, 7 Times Square. 

April 26, 2019. ESNY/ARCE/NY Lecture. Dr. Kasia Szpakowska, Associate Professor of Egyptology at Swansea University.  Armed and Dangerous: An Iconography of Protective Ancient Egyptian Daemons. 6:30 PM at the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

May 1, 2019. Dr. Julien Cooper, Research Associate in Egyptology, Yale University. The Desert of Gold: New fieldwork and discoveries in the Eastern Desert of Sudan. 6:00 PM at Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, 7 Times Square.

May 17, 2019. ESNY Lecture. Dr. Christina Geisen. On Magical Wands, Ritual, Storytelling, and a Building Sketch: Solving the Enigma of the Late Middle Kingdom Owner of Tomb Ramesseum 5.  6:30 PM at Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

June 7, 2019. ESNY Lecture.  Dr. Faïza Drici. Around the Bow and Arrow: The Identity of the Kushite Archers. 7:00 PM at The Art Study Room, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

June 20, 2019. ARCE/NY / National Arts Club Lecture.  Prof. Ogden Goelet and Dr. Sameh Iskander Recent work at Abydos. The National Arts Club.








LOCATION: Egyptian Consulate, 866 United Nations Plaza, Suite 586 New York, NY (48th St. and 1st Avenue)

TIME: 6:00 PM, FREE TO THE PUBLIC. RECEPTION TO FOLLOW LECTURE. 

Due to security considerations an R.S.V.P. is required ON OR BEFORE MARCH 10. Please reply to [email protected] No one will be admitted who is not on the guest list.

ABSTRACT: We don't often think about how similar or different ancient Egypt and its religion and politics may have been from our own world today. Yet frequently the strategies and tactics used by rulers in ancient history are not greatly different from the modern era. One of the things that I have stressed in my 30-plus years of teaching at the university level is how much ancient Egyptians were like us -- not strange people who made mummies and worshipped animal-like deities, but humans with exactly the same concerns, hopes, and egos that we have. It is what keeps us connected to them over long times and not just for the brief splashy discoveries.
     Akhenaten achieved a brand new religion, nearly that of monotheism, instituted it and built a new city to give it a home in a short 17-year reign. This talk examines that phenomenon by comparing it to similar types of religious revolutions in less distant historical eras: the Protestant revolution of the 16th century in England and the Bolshevik attempt to stamp out all religion except atheism in the early 20th century. It will then compare carefully with Akhenaten's steps to see what characteristics their tactics shared and what was successful and what not.


ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Betsy Bryan is the Alexander Badawy Professor of Egyptian Art and Archaeology at Johns Hopkins University and President of the Board of Governors of the American Research Center in Egypt, Inc. She received her Ph.D. from Yale University in 1980. Her areas of specialization are history, art and archaeology of the New Kingdom. Her current fieldwork is in the temple complex of the goddess Mut at South Karnak, and her research focuses on defining the earliest forms of the temple of Mut of Isheru.